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Sunday, January 22, 2017

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part x16, the Output in the Method of Scene Writing, Rising Action


22 January 2017, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part x16, the Output in the Method of Scene Writing, Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.

2. Entertain your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don't show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.  This might need some tweaking.  The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.  

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:

1.  Scene input (easy)

2.  Scene output (a little harder)

3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)

4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)

5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)

6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

 

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

 

For novel 28:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

 

For novel 29:  Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

 

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

1.      Design the initial scene

2.      Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)

a.       Research as required

b.      Develop the initial setting

c.       Develop the characters

d.      Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)

3.      Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)

4.      Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)

5.      Write the climax scene

6.      Write the falling action scene(s)

7.      Write the dénouement scene

 

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

 

1.      Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2.      Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3.      Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4.      Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5.      Write the release

6.      Write the kicker

 

To complete the idea of using a method to actually write a scene, look at the third step.  The output you develop to write the scene becomes the input for the next scene.  This isn’t entirely true for the first and second scenes in School.  The first scene in School is the discovery of the hidden girl and the fight.  The output is the fight and the kicker where Deirdre is punished.  Her punishment is the obvious output of the scene.  There is however, another output.  The other output is the fight itself.  After the fight, Deirdre tells Sorcha to run away.  The output of this is that Sorcha ran away.  The incomplete part is there has been no resolution between Sorcha and Deirdre.  Further, Sorcha has an enormous problem she must solve.  The problem is that Deirdre has discovered that Sorcha appears to not be an official student at the school.  Sorcha must either get rid of Deirdre or shut her up.  If she can’t shut up Deirdre, she will be discovered.  This idea is part of the telic flaw in the novel and a creative element that traces through the entire novel. 

 

This problem must be resolved—the question is when.  I designed both Sorcha and Deirdre to be overwhelming personalities and people.  Deirdre more than Sorcha.  They likely started as the same, but Sorcha has learned caution and care because of her past.  The obvious next scene input is Deirdre’s punishment.  The not so obvious next scene input is Sorcha’s problem.  I chose to put a scene before Deirdre’s punishment.  In this scene, Sorcha confronts Deirdre.  Where Sorcha expects only to see where her future lies and how she can manipulate or affect Deirdre, she is completely surprised by Deirdre’s reaction.  Where Sorcha expects confrontation and another fight—an intellectual one—Deirdre instead is completely welcoming and helpful.  Not just helpful, but pleasant and accepting.  Deirdre is an odd bird anyway, and Sorcha is carried along before she can do anything to stop it.  They become a pair locked in mutual support and sharing mutual secrets.  Thus the novel begins.   

 

More tomorrow.


For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Saturday, January 21, 2017

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part x15, the Kicker in the Method of Scene Writing, Rising Action


21 January 2017, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part x15, the Kicker in the Method of Scene Writing, Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.

2. Entertain your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don't show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.  This might need some tweaking.  The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.  

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:

1.  Scene input (easy)

2.  Scene output (a little harder)

3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)

4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)

5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)

6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

 

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

 

For novel 28:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

 

For novel 29:  Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

 

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

1.      Design the initial scene

2.      Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)

a.       Research as required

b.      Develop the initial setting

c.       Develop the characters

d.      Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)

3.      Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)

4.      Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)

5.      Write the climax scene

6.      Write the falling action scene(s)

7.      Write the dénouement scene

 

Here is the scene development outline again.  This is an outline to help you develop a scene. 

 

1.  Scene input (easy)

2.  Scene output (a little harder)

3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)

4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)

5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)

6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

 

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

 

1.      Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2.      Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3.      Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4.      Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5.      Write the release

6.      Write the kicker

 

The release for the initial scene in School is the fight between Deirdre and Sorcha.  After that comes the kicker.  Some kickers are stronger than others.  Here is the kicker from the initial scene of School. 

 

Luna and Ms. Beckworth stepped out of the room.  Ms. Beckworth closed the door with a snap.  Deirdre glanced at the page of rules.  It was an entire sheet of tightly typed text numbered from one to twenty.  Deirdre gave a huge sigh, sat at her desk, licked her pencil, and began memorizing the entire page of rules.

What you didn’t see before is that after the fight, Deirdre was given a punishment. She missed lunch and supper, and she had to memorize the rules of the house.  The kicker here isn’t that strong, but it is still a kicker.  Here it is again:

 

Deirdre gave a huge sigh, sat at her desk, licked her pencil, and began memorizing the entire page of rules.      

 

The kicker completes the scene and ties it to the output and the next scene.  Completes the scene is important.  You can just write, Deirdre studied the rules.  That’s okay, but the trick is to complete the scene and refer to the output.  If you remember the output becomes the input into the next scene, you can guess where the next scene should go.  Here is the kicker from the next scene:

 

Sorcha curled with her back toward Deirdre.  She had never slept with anyone else.  She’d never been this close to another person, not on purpose.  She wasn’t sure what to say to Deirdre’s statement—attack mode.  She heard Deirdre’s empty stomach rumbling for a while, but the girl’s breathing became quickly regular.  Sorcha slowly drifted off to sleep.

Notice, concludes the scene and points to the next scene.  In this case, it is easy—the next scene is in the morning.  The second scene is also an intermediate scene.  It is not the expected next scene.  The second scene is Sorcha and Deirdre’s interaction and reconciliation.  The third scene is really the continuation of the first scene.  In the first scene, the output is that Deirdre must memorize the house rules for Mrs. Beckworth.  And thus the scenes continue.

 

More tomorrow.


For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic

Friday, January 20, 2017

Writing Ideas - New Novel, part x14, Using Creative Elements in the Method of Scene Writing, Rising Action


20 January 2017, Writing Ideas - New Novel, part x14, Using Creative Elements in the Method of Scene Writing, Rising Action

Announcement: Delay, my new novels can be seen on the internet, but the publisher has delayed all their fiction output due to the economy.  I'll keep you informed.  More information can be found at www.ancientlight.com.  Check out my novels--I think you'll really enjoy them.

Introduction: I wrote the novel Aksinya: Enchantment and the Daemon. This was my 21st novel and through this blog, I gave you the entire novel in installments that included commentary on the writing. In the commentary, in addition to other general information on writing, I explained, how the novel was constructed, the metaphors and symbols in it, the writing techniques and tricks I used, and the way I built the scenes. You can look back through this blog and read the entire novel beginning with http://www.pilotlion.blogspot.com/2010/10/new-novel-part-3-girl-and-demon.html.

I'm using this novel as an example of how I produce, market, and eventually (we hope) get a novel published. I'll keep you informed along the way.

Today's Blog: To see the steps in the publication process, visit my writing website http://www.ldalford.com/ and select "production schedule," you will be sent to http://www.sisteroflight.com/.

The four plus one basic rules I employ when writing:

1. Don't confuse your readers.

2. Entertain your readers.

3. Ground your readers in the writing.

4. Don't show (or tell) everything.

     4a. Show what can be seen, heard, felt, smelled, and tasted on the stage of the novel.

5. Immerse yourself in the world of your writing.

All novels have five discrete parts:

1.  The initial scene (the beginning)

2.  The rising action

3.  The climax

4.  The falling action

5.  The dénouement

I finished writing my 27th novel, working title, Claire, potential title Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse.  This might need some tweaking.  The theme statement is: Claire (Sorcha) Davis accepts Shiggy, a dangerous screw-up, into her Stela branch of the organization and rehabilitates her.  

Here is the cover proposal for Sorcha: Enchantment and the Curse

Cover Proposal

The most important scene in any novel is the initial scene, but eventually, you have to move to the rising action. I started writing my 28th novel, working title Red Sonja.  I’m also working on my 29th novel, working title School.

I'm an advocate of using the/a scene input/output method to drive the rising action--in fact, to write any novel. 

Scene development:

1.  Scene input (easy)

2.  Scene output (a little harder)

3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)

4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)

5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)

6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

 

How to begin a novel.  Number one thought, we need an entertaining idea.  I usually encapsulate such an idea with a theme statement.  Since I’m writing a new novel, we need a new theme statement.  Here is an initial cut.

 

For novel 28:  Red Sonja, a Soviet spy, infiltrates the X-plane programs at Edwards AFB as a test pilot’s administrative clerk, learns about freedom, and is redeemed.

 

For novel 29:  Sorcha, the abandoned child of an Unseelie and a human, secretly attends Wycombe Abbey girls’ school where she meets the problem child Deirdre and is redeemed.

 

These are the steps I use to write a novel:

 

1.      Design the initial scene

2.      Develop a theme statement (initial setting, protagonist, protagonist’s helper or antagonist, action statement)

a.       Research as required

b.      Develop the initial setting

c.       Develop the characters

d.      Identify the telic flaw (internal and external)

3.      Write the initial scene (identify the output: implied setting, implied characters, implied action movement)

4.      Write the next scene(s) to the climax (rising action)

5.      Write the climax scene

6.      Write the falling action scene(s)

7.      Write the dénouement scene

 

Here is the scene development outline again.  This is an outline to help you develop a scene. 

 

1.  Scene input (easy)

2.  Scene output (a little harder)

3.  Scene setting (basic stuff)

4.  Creativity (creative elements of the scene: transition from input to output focused on the telic flaw resolution)

5.  Tension (development of creative elements to build excitement)

6.  Release (climax of creative elements)

 

Here is the beginning of the method from the outline:

 

1.      Scene input (comes from the previous scene output or is an initial scene)

2.      Write the scene setting (place, time, stuff, and characters)

3.      Imagine the output, creative elements, plot, telic flaw resolution (climax) and develop the tension and release.

4.      Write the scene using the output and creative elements to build the tension.

5.      Write the release

6.      Write the kicker

 

For example, in my latest novel, School, the initial scene creative elements are broadly these:  the troubled protagonist (Deirdre), the hidden girl (Sorcha), the discovery, and the fight.  These are creative elements because they are elements (nouns) that are used to create action and conversation in the scene.  Thus, the troubled protagonist is described and action revolves around her.  The hidden girl (the protagonist’s helper) is introduced, described, and action involves here and the protagonist.  The discovery is the revelation of the secret of the hidden girl.  This involves action and conversation.  The fight is the logical tension and release as a result of the discovery of the hidden girl.  Once you have the creative elements, the author can sculpt them into the scene.

 

In this initial scene, the scene setting and introduction of the troubled protagonist begin the scene.  The scene input is assumed.  Since this is the initial scene, the input is all the actions that occurred before that will be eventually reveled in the novel.  The author has or should have already developed this information.  Everything in the novel flows from this.  The introduction of the protagonist is precursory and just basic information.  The hidden girl gets brought in and her revelation focuses the scene to the discovery and the fight.  If you notice, the entire scene is concentrated around the creative elements.  The creative elements form the basis for everything in the scene.  They are entertaining and exciting because of what they are.  For example, who can resist a troubled protagonist?  Who doesn’t find a girl with a secret—a hidden girl interesting?  The discovery of such a hidden girl can only be monumental in the life of the hidden girl and those who discover her—the protagonist.  A fight is automatically entertaining.  A justified and unjustified fight is even better. 

 

The hidden girl is threatened—she attacks the troubled protagonist.  The troubled protagonist is troubled because she fights well and too often.  That’s why she is exiled to this school.  The fight is glorious and quickly over.  The hidden girl hasn’t lost often.  She is overwhelmed by the troubled protagonist.  This is delicious and expected but unexpected.  The creative element propels the tension and release.  The release completes the scene.  Then there is a kicker.     

 

More tomorrow.


For more information, you can visit my author site http://www.ldalford.com/, and my individual novel websites:

fiction, theme, plot, story, storyline, character development, scene, setting, conversation, novel, book, writing, information, study, marketing, tension, release, creative, idea, logic