My Favorites

Friday, August 5, 2011

A New Novel, Part 305 Lifting the Crowns

5 August 2011, A New Novel, Part 305 Lifting the Crowns

For those who haven’t been following this blog, let me introduce it a little. I am currently blogging my 21st novel that has the working title Daemon. The novel is about Aksinya, a sorceress, who, to save her family from the Bolsheviks, called and contracted the demon, Asmodeus. Her family was murdered anyway, and she fled with the demon from Russia to Austria.

Father Dobrushin and Aksinya have decided to marry so that they can be rid of the demon.  We are continuing with the Orthodox marriage ceremony.  The prayers continue...

Father Makar, “Peace to all.”
Ekaterina, “And to your spirit.”
Dobrushin, “Let us bow our heads to the Lord.”
Ekaterina, “To you, O Lord.”
Father Makar lifted the cup from the altar.  He held it high.
Dobrushin, “Let us pray to the Lord.”
Ekaterina, “Lord, have mercy.”
Father Makar blessed the cup, “O God, who made all things by your strength, who made the inhabited world firm and adorned the crown of all that had been made by you, bless too with your spiritual blessing this common Cup, which you grant to those who have been joined in the communion of marriage.  For blessed is your name and glorified your kingdom, of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, now and for ever, and to the ages of ages.”
Father Makar held the cup for Dobrushin to drink then Aksinya.  He offered them the cup three times while stating, “I will take the cup of salvation and I will call on the name of the Lord.”
Then he grasped Dobrushin and Aksinya by the hands and led them around the altar three times.
Ekaterina followed behind and chanted, “The Virgin has conceived and given birth to a Son, Emmanuel, who is both God and man. Orient is his name, whom we magnify as we call the Virgin blessed.  Holy Martyrs, who fought the good fight and were crowned, intercede with the Lord to have mercy on our souls.  Glory to you, Christ God, boast of Apostles, joy of Martyrs whose preaching was the consubstantial Trinity.
When they stood at the front of the altar again, Father Makar raised Dobrushin’s crown, “Bridegroom, be magnified like Abraham, blessed like Isaac and multiplied like Jacob, as you go your way in peace and carry out in righteousness the commandments of God.”  He set the crown back on Dobrushin’s head.
Father Makar moved to Aksinya.  He raised her crown, “And you, Bride, be magnified like Sara, and rejoice like Rebecca and be multiplied like Rachel, rejoicing in your own husband, keeping the limits of the law, for so God has been well-pleased.”  He lowered the crown back onto her head.
Dobrushin, “Let us pray to the Lord.”

The bride and groom are offered the cup of peace.  They share in it three times.  Then Father Makar led them around the altar three times.  Finally, we have the lifting of the crowns.  Father Makar blesses them at each point. 

There is much powerful symbology in every step of the Orthodox marriage ceremony.  I won't try to describe every point, much is obvious--some is lost in time.  In general, most of you can see how these pieces fit into the work as a whole.  Specifically, the marriage, as I mentioned before, is a primary metaphor in this novel for the theme of the novel.  Since this novel is a semi-allegory of the Book of Tobit, you might want to check out that work to see exactly where this might fit.

No comments:

Post a Comment